Wheel compatibility

Discussion in 'General Motoring' started by Tim McNamara, Dec 2, 2008.

  1. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    A friend of mine wants to get rid of a set of four alloy wheels and
    tires off an 850- by having me take them for my car. I've got a 240 and
    while the stud spacing measures correctly, eyeballing them it looks like
    they are too wide (by a good 2" if not 3") and the diameter looks too
    large. Am I right? If so I'll probably just put them up on Craigslist
    for him.
     
    Tim McNamara, Dec 2, 2008
    #1
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  2. Tim McNamara

    James Sweet Guest


    The offset is different, you can fit them with spacer plates, I don't
    personally care for that solution but people do it and it does work.
     
    James Sweet, Dec 2, 2008
    #2
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  3. Tim McNamara

    Roger Mills Guest

    In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
    There are three considerations in addition to whether the stud holes are in
    the right place:

    1. Rolling Radius
    You can calculate this reasonably accurately by adding the rim radius to the
    tyre width times the aspect ratio. This needs to be within a few percent
    from old to new tyre, otherwise the gearing and speedometer/odometer
    readings will be wrong. You can sometimes get away with a larger rim and a
    lower aspect ratio tyre.

    2. Tyre Width
    If the new tyres are substantially wider than the old ones, there's a good
    chance that they'll foul the bodywork on full lock or sever bumps - it
    depends on how much clearance there is to start with.

    3. Offset
    This is the horizontal distance between the plane through the centre of the
    rim and the face which bolts to the hub. The wheels on front wheel drive
    cars invariably have a larger offset than those on rear wheel drive cars to
    cater for the constant velocity joint. If you fit FWD wheels on a RWD car,
    the centreline of the tyre will be too far inboard - reducing the track and
    increasing the likelihood of body fouling. You can sometimes compensate for
    this by using spacers.
    --
    Cheers,
    Roger
    ______
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    Roger Mills, Dec 2, 2008
    #3
  4. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    Thanks, everybody! That was very helpful.
     
    Tim McNamara, Dec 2, 2008
    #4
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