Help with 1967 122 wagon

Discussion in 'General Motoring' started by stevek, Sep 1, 2006.

  1. stevek

    stevek Guest

    I posted this on the brickboard and figured this may be a good place
    too.--A few days ago I bought a 67 122 wagon. Except for some pan rust,
    the body seems nice with decent oxidised paint that I'm currently
    polishing. Car is drivable, I drove it home on freeway about 15 miles,
    but is most likely not too safe at the moment, but that never stopped
    me lol. Engine, clutch, and transmission seem fine, but brakes,
    suspension/front end, and a lot of little things need work. Although I
    have some disability in my hands and limited mechanical ability, I'd
    like to fix what I'm able to. Except for the old "vw idiot's manual" by
    john muir, I've always found auto repair manuals to be for those people
    who already know what they're doing. I'd like to find someone in the
    los angeles area who knows these cars well, and will, for a reasonable
    price, go over it with me and let me know what has to be done, what can
    wait and about what it will cost if they or someone else does it. As
    money is definitly an issue, would want something pretty detailed.
    Instead of just saying "your front end"s messed up" which I already
    know, tell me this, this, and that on the front end needs to be fixed.
    Maybe it all needs to be done but maybe not. I know plenty of
    independent volvo shops but they're all too pricey for me so what I
    think I need is an amateur volvo mechanic who wants to make some extra
    dough but will be cheaper than an independent garage or dealer. One
    last thought--I love the look of these amazons and love the pale green
    paint of mine but I'm not sure I want to keep it. Perhaps I'm spoiled
    by my 95 850, but the older I get the less discomfort I want to put up
    with, and as I was driving home the 122 without power steering or air
    conditioning in 95 degree heat, sweating buckets, I thought, what have
    I gotten myself into--a sweedish sauna. Any way to add ps and ac to a
    122 or is it way too costly and difficult?
     
    stevek, Sep 1, 2006
    #1
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  2. stevek

    mjc Guest

    You could get aftermarket A/C on these cars when they were
    new, so I see no reason why it can't be added now. Power steering
    is another matter. If the 140 series ever had it, you might be
    able to adapt one of those assemblies. As an alternative, you can
    try using narrow VW Beetle tires on the front, inflated fairly
    high. I believe the size is 155/70 15, but I'm not positive. Less
    grip, but also much lower steering effort. My '86 Civic Si had a
    similar problem, which I solved by using all-season tires that
    have some of the tread on a bevelled area at the top of the
    sidewall, where it only contacts the road when cornering at
    speed. They give me a good compromise between steering effort and
    grip, with the added benefit of amazing fuel economy.
     
    mjc, Sep 1, 2006
    #2
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  3. stevek

    Gary Heston Guest

    The 140 series had retrofit A/C available (although you'd lose the
    glove box--that was where the evaporator went).

    They also had power steering; one of my recent hassles was finding a
    non-power steering gear box; several places had power gear boxes, but
    nobody had a new/rebuilt manual one.

    Bear in mind that both of these accessories take power from the engine,
    so performance and mileage will suffer. You may need the supercharger
    I recently posted a link to...


    Gary
     
    Gary Heston, Sep 1, 2006
    #3
  4. stevek

    User Guest

    For parts:

    http://www.scandcar.com/
    http://www.cvi-automotive.se/
    http://www.swedishclassics.com/

    A company called FrigiKing, located somwhere in Texas, made the dealer
    A/C installation kits, but I don't think they're still around. They used
    the old York compressor that shook badly enough to break the bracket and
    studs that held it on. Check in the hotrod magazines for a source for
    one of the newer underdash kits made for custom cars. You can use R134a
    and a modern rotary compressor to build a superior system.

    Bob
     
    User, Sep 1, 2006
    #4
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