Towing a 1988 240 5 speed manual

Discussion in 'Volvo 240' started by Larry Brockman, Jul 19, 2003.

  1. I know this question has probably been asked 1000 times, but I need to tow
    an 88 240 5-speed manual about 80 miles. I have two questions:

    1. Can I leave the drive shaft connected and tow it with all 4 wheels on the
    ground?

    2. What kind of tow bar would I need?

    3. Other considerations?

    Thanks, in advance.
     
    Larry Brockman, Jul 19, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Larry Brockman

    Graham W Guest

    What country are you in?In the UK it's a surprisingly complex issue, as I
    found out myself recently when I needed to do something similar.

    Graham W
     
    Graham W, Jul 19, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Larry Brockman

    James Sweet Guest

    Put it in neutral and tow it. I had a hard time finding a tow bar the last
    time I moved a car and we had to rent a car trailer.
     
    James Sweet, Jul 20, 2003
    #3
  4. Larry Brockman

    Mike F Guest

    If he's in North America, he faces no such legal problems. Anybody can
    hook just about anything to any vehicle and start towing. The police do
    frown on trailers with lights that don't work and missing safety chains,
    and around here they do look a little closer at the general safety of
    both vehicles than those without trailers.
     
    Mike F, Jul 21, 2003
    #4
  5. Larry Brockman

    Stuart Gray Guest

    When my 740 broke down (wire gave way in the Hall effect sensor in the
    dist.) the AA van used a tow rope to drag me home. Was fun with the power
    steering and brakes out !!! If it's good enough for them ?

    Stuart.
     
    Stuart Gray, Jul 21, 2003
    #5
  6. Larry Brockman

    Peter Milnes Guest

    If it is OK for UK garages to tow cars for considerable distances using an
    "ambulance" (what you called a dolly) and tow frames which operate the steering
    as well, or even rigid towbars, then it must be OK for the ordinary person to
    use the same methods. I know of no law that forbids their use in the UK.

    Cheers, Peter.

    : Graham W wrote:
    : >
    : > The main problem he faces, if he's in the UK, is that towing a vehicle any
    : > distance with one of those dolly's is illegal. They are strictly for
    : > removing a stricken vehicle to a place of safety. ie, if it breaks down on
    : > the motorway, you can use it to take the car to the next exit out of harms
    : > way. Unfortunately even by stretching what you consider a safe place, he'd
    : > be hard pressed to justify 80 miles ;-)
    : >
    : > In the UK, it is a similar story with rigid towbars, A-frames, etc etc. The
    : > only legal anser here is a proper car trailer. Even then there are
    : > regulations on towing weights, braked and unbraked trailers, when you got
    : > your licence and so on and so on! In the end I just hired a guy with a car
    : > transporter for half a day. Expensive, but very very convenient.
    : >
    : > Graham W
    :
    : If he's in North America, he faces no such legal problems. Anybody can
    : hook just about anything to any vehicle and start towing. The police do
    : frown on trailers with lights that don't work and missing safety chains,
    : and around here they do look a little closer at the general safety of
    : both vehicles than those without trailers.
    :
    : --
    : Mike F.
    : Thornhill (near Toronto), Ont.
    :
    : Change cant to ca and remove parentheses to email me directly.
     
    Peter Milnes, Jul 22, 2003
    #6
  7. Larry Brockman

    Graham W Guest

    Because you don't know of such a law, doesn't mean it doesn't exist. Check
    it out for yourself. it exists.

    Graham W
     
    Graham W, Jul 22, 2003
    #7
  8. Larry Brockman

    Graham W Guest

    For the benefit of anyone int he UK considering this, I believe it will
    answer most questions, and also the point raised further downt he thread
    about how come the AA/RAC etc are allowed to use them. This snippet from the
    TTAS (the Trailer & Towing Advisory Service int he UK)...

    Quote:
    There was evidence of much confusion concerning the recovery, as opposed to
    transportation, of cars.

    The law considers any towed vehicle to be a "trailer". Thus a vehicle being
    towed with the aid of either an "A" frame or a towing dolly, is considered
    to be a trailer unit.

    If the weight of the trailer unit exceeds either 750 kg, or ½ the weight of
    the towing vehicle, or the towing vehicle manufacturers stated unbraked
    towing capacity, whichever is least; then it is required to be fitted with
    brakes that operate on all wheels.

    TTAS is not aware of an "A" frame unit that is able to effectively apply the
    brakes of the towed vehicle.

    A towing dolly may be equipped with brakes, but only on it's own wheels, the
    other axle of the vehicle mounted on it will not have operable brakes - so
    by definition it is not a braked trailer - and should never exceed either
    750 kg, or ½ the weight of the towing vehicle, or the towing vehicle
    manufacturers stated unbraked towing capacity, whichever is least.

    Legislation does allow for the recovery of a vehicle, from a position where
    it constitutes a hazard, to a safe-haven. However, to proceed beyond the
    first safe-haven becomes transport, as opposed to recovery. In this instance
    a car transporter trailer is required, whereby the entire vehicle is carried
    upon the trailer (or towed vehicle) the trailers axle(s) being equipped with
    the requisite brakes.

    There is an exception to the foregoing in relation to the legitimate use of
    recovery equipment by recognised Vehicle Recovery Operators, whose vehicles
    will usually be taxed accordingly.
    Unquote.

    Graham W
     
    Graham W, Jul 22, 2003
    #8
  9. Larry Brockman

    Stuart Gray Guest

    Quite an eye opener that Graham. Must be a lot of illegal "trailers" in the
    UK eh?

    Stuart
     
    Stuart Gray, Jul 22, 2003
    #9
  10. From a point at sea, to the circles of your mind, this is Graham W:
    <snip>

    Well, dammit, it seems you may be right. At least the National Trailer
    and Towing Association agree with you.

    Still, the situation with a tow rope is not clear. It seems more
    subtle, because the vehicle behind has it own steering, brakes and
    even driver.


    --

    Stewart Hargrave

    Faster than public transport


    For email, replace 'SpamOnlyToHere' with my name
     
    Stewart Hargrave, Jul 22, 2003
    #10
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.