Turning off daytime running lights on a 2002 V70

Discussion in 'Volvo V70' started by njord, Sep 5, 2007.

  1. njord

    njord Guest

    Is there any way for an owner to do this?
     
    njord, Sep 5, 2007
    #1
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  2. njord

    mdrawson Guest

    On the 2000 S70, there is a small screw just next to the headlight switch
    which you can turn to shut off the DRL function. I would assume it would be
    the same for the V70
     
    mdrawson, Sep 6, 2007
    #2
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  3. Hi,
    try the way it can be done in my '00 V40:

    - switch on ignition
    - switch on parking lights (1st position)
    - pull and hold (!) high beam lever
    - switch off lights while holding high beam lever
    - done :)

    Switching on and off DRL is the same procedure.


    HTH!


    Roland
    (Austria)
     
    Roland Messerschmidt, Sep 6, 2007
    #3
  4. The 2002 does not have the small screwdriver switch near the headlight
    switch like older models did. You can have your dealer change it so
    they aren't on when the switch is off. They may not do it since some
    idiots would sue their dealer if they got into an accident blaming the
    dealer for doing what they told him to do.

    The manual for your car which is on line at:

    http://www.volvocars.us/tools/OwnersInfo/

    specifically at:

    http://new.volvocars.com/ownersdocs/2002/2002_V70/02v70_00.htm

    states the following:

    "Models with daytime running lights: Low beam headlights will
    automatically come on if the ignition key is in position II. Front and
    rear parking lights and license plate lights will also be on.

    Volvo recommends the use of daytime running lights. If, however, you
    would prefer to have these lights turned off (USA only), please consult
    your Volvo retailer. Please note that the use of daytime running lights
    is mandatory in Canada."

    The other way is to use the parking light position. But you will
    probably forget to shut them off when you park, so why not leave them so
    they help keep your car the safe car it is.

    Daytime running lights (DRLs) are a low-cost method to reduce crashes.
    They are especially effective in preventing daytime head-on and
    front-corner collisions by increasing vehicle conspicuity and making it
    easier to detect approaching vehicles from farther away.

    They are required in many countries including Canada and Sweden.

    Nearly all published reports indicate DRLs reduce multiple-vehicle
    daytime crashes. Evidence about DRL effects on crashes comes from
    studies conducted in Scandinavia, Canada, and the United States. A study
    examining the effect of Norway's DRL law from 1980 to 1990 found a 10
    percent decline in daytime multiple-vehicle crashes. A Danish study
    reported a 7 percent reduction in DRL-relevant crashes in the first 15
    months after DRL use was required and a 37 percent decline in left-turn
    crashes. In a second study covering 2 years and 9 months of Denmark's
    law, there was a 6 percent reduction in daytime multiple-vehicle crashes
    and a 34 percent reduction in left-turn crashes. A 1994 Transport Canada
    study comparing 1990 model year vehicles with DRLs to 1989 vehicles
    without them found that DRLs reduced relevant daytime multiple-vehicle
    crashes by 11 percent.

    In the United States, a 1985 Institute study determined that commercial
    fleet passenger vehicles modified to operate with DRLs were involved in
    7 percent fewer daytime multiple-vehicle crashes than similar vehicles
    without DRLs. A small-scale fleet study conducted in the 1960s found an
    18 percent lower daytime multiple-vehicle crash rate for DRL-equipped
    vehicles. Multiple-vehicle daytime crashes account for about half of all
    police-reported crashes in the United States. A 2002 Institute study
    reported a 3 percent decline in daytime multiple-vehicle crash risk in
    nine US states concurrent with the introduction of DRLs. Federal
    researchers, using data collected nationwide, concluded that there was a
    5 percent decline in daytime, two-vehicle, opposite-direction crashes
    and a 12 percent decline in fatal crashes with pedestrians and
    bicyclists.
     
    Stephen Henning, Sep 6, 2007
    #4
  5. njord

    Roadie Guest

    I've got to ask why you would want to disable a safety feature that
    could actually help alert another driver to your presence.
     
    Roadie, Sep 7, 2007
    #5
  6. njord

    Roger Mills Guest

    In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

    Why not have the horn sounding whenever you are moving - that would be even
    better?! <g>
    --
    Cheers,
    Roger
    ______
    Email address maintained for newsgroup use only, and not regularly
    monitored.. Messages sent to it may not be read for several weeks.
    PLEASE REPLY TO NEWSGROUP!
     
    Roger Mills, Sep 7, 2007
    #6
  7. njord

    M. Fricker Guest

    Even people trying to be JERKS know that loud noises distract drivers
    and make the situation less safe unless there is an impending collision
    and the sudden onset of noise brings attention to it.
     
    M. Fricker, Sep 7, 2007
    #7
  8. njord

    Roger Mills Guest

    In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
    But it wouldn't be a sudden noise, it would be a *continuous* noise which
    gets louder as you get close to it. What better way to alert other drivers
    to your presence?

    It's no more stupid that having your headlamps full on in broad daylight, at
    any rate!
    --
    Cheers,
    Roger
    ______
    Email address maintained for newsgroup use only, and not regularly
    monitored.. Messages sent to it may not be read for several weeks.
    PLEASE REPLY TO NEWSGROUP!
     
    Roger Mills, Sep 7, 2007
    #8
  9. njord

    M. Fricker Guest

    You are a perfect candidate for a Darwin Award. I would venture to say
    that you probably even drive a car that is the similar shade as the
    highway surface. And you probably wonder why people pull in front of
    you. What a pity. You probably don't even turn you headlights on until
    it is too dark to see where your are going. After all, that is all you
    think they are good for, seeing where you are going at night. They
    would never help others see your car, especially when you are driving
    out of a shady area on a bright sunny day.

    To which cemetery should they send your Darwin Award?
     
    M. Fricker, Sep 9, 2007
    #9
  10. njord

    Roger Mills Guest

    In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
    <SNIP even more insulting twaddle>

    If DRLs are such a good idea, why aren't they mandatory in all countries?
    --
    Cheers,
    Roger
    ______
    Email address maintained for newsgroup use only, and not regularly
    monitored.. Messages sent to it may not be read for several weeks.
    PLEASE REPLY TO NEWSGROUP!
     
    Roger Mills, Sep 9, 2007
    #10
  11. njord

    njord Guest

    Thanks to all who responded. There is no screw and the 'holding high beam
    switch while turning off light' option did not work. So I guess it's to the
    dealer I go (unfortunately, since I will probably be charged $100 for a five
    minute job). Ah, well, I can't do much on today's cars anyway. Why should a
    theoretically simple job like this be any different.

    Njord
    "Sailing-the fine art of getting wet and becoming ill
    while slowly going nowhere at great expense."
    From: "Sailing: A Sailor's Dictionary"
    by Beard & McKie
     
    njord, Sep 10, 2007
    #11
  12. I look at the Volvo's DLR's , ( and operate the same as )
    the anti collision lights on my Cessna ..... What harm
    does a bit of extra electrical juce for some extra lighting
    do..?
     
    ~^ beancounter ~^, Sep 11, 2007
    #12
  13. njord

    Roger Hunt Guest

    ~^ beancounter ~^ wrote
    They consume power, albeit only a little, but that is derived from
    fossil fuel and it all adds up to a devastating contribution to Global
    warming.

    The only responsible thing to do is to disable all vehicle lights
    permanently, and also, in the case of aircraft, any warning lights and
    all radar and radio equipment too.

    You know it makes sense!
     
    Roger Hunt, Sep 11, 2007
    #13
  14. " You know it makes sense! "

    do you really believe all that crap ??
     
    ~^ beancounter ~^, Sep 11, 2007
    #14
  15. njord

    Roger Mills Guest

    In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
    Perhaps you should hone up your irony detector?<g>
    --
    Cheers,
    Roger
    ______
    Email address maintained for newsgroup use only, and not regularly
    monitored.. Messages sent to it may not be read for several weeks.
    PLEASE REPLY TO NEWSGROUP!
     
    Roger Mills, Sep 11, 2007
    #15
  16. ummm, perhaps Roger...tell ya what...I will conatct
    you if I ever get interested in saving the world...thanx
    for the advice......
     
    ~^ beancounter ~^, Sep 11, 2007
    #16
  17. njord

    Roadie Guest


    An excellent idea! Combine honking all the time with leaving the 4
    way flshers on, driving 20 mph below the limit, using daytime running
    lights and it's guaranteed that he will be noticed by other drivers.
    Some of whom will undoubtedly reciprocate with a salute.

    I saw some gal driving on the freeway at 40mph, hands gripped on the
    wheel, peering intently at the road in front of her through the spokes
    of the steering wheel with the 4 way flashers bliking madly and high
    beams on. Truly an accident waiting to happen.
     
    Roadie, Sep 11, 2007
    #17
  18. njord

    Roger Hunt Guest

    ~^ beancounter ~^ wrote
    Which of us Rogers are you communicating with?
    The sensible one or the twisted one?
     
    Roger Hunt, Sep 11, 2007
    #18
  19. njord

    Roger Mills Guest

    In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
    Which one are you?<g>
    --
    Cheers,
    Roger
    ______
    Email address maintained for newsgroup use only, and not regularly
    monitored.. Messages sent to it may not be read for several weeks.
    PLEASE REPLY TO NEWSGROUP!
     
    Roger Mills, Sep 11, 2007
    #19
  20. njord

    Roger Hunt Guest

    Roger Mills wrote
    I must be the sensible one, having this afternoon fitted new front discs
    + pads to my beautiful and wonderful 1998 V40 2.0i., and have just
    returned home after a good bit of fast night driving to test out and bed
    in the new bits (big grin of sharp handling, excellent headlights and
    lovely brake feel.).

    This arvo also saw me treat it to a thorough cooling system flush, until
    the water ran clear (about a litre is held within the engine block so
    filling, running, draining got the water coming out clear after half a
    dozen cycles. There may be a drain on the block but I didn't bother
    looking too closely - it was easy enough.)
    Then filled it with 33% anti-freeze mix.

    At the weekend my baby will receive a new clutch master cylinder, the
    original beginning to show early signs of senility (it creaks, and will
    soon start to leak) after 120,000 miles.
    This job looks to be very easy - I mean, the master cyl fixings are
    accessible from the engine bay, so a doddle to remove and replace.

    The next treat will be a decent horn, the original Volvo one sounds like
    a strangled parrot, straining on the toilet.
     
    Roger Hunt, Sep 12, 2007
    #20
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