used Volvo 740 DL: accessing timing belt condition?

Discussion in 'Volvo 740' started by sue sanchez, May 1, 2004.

  1. sue sanchez

    sue sanchez Guest

    Our little dog rescue recently received the donation of a 1990 Volvo
    740 DL sedan (no turbo). We have no way of knowing when the timing
    belt was last changed (2111,000 miles on the clock). In general the
    car was not well cared for but it runs well now that it has had a
    tune-up.

    Can a mechanic accurately inspect the timing belt to determine if it
    should be replaced? Is this engine an "interference engine" where
    gastly things will occurs if the timing belt breaks? Should we just go
    ahead and replace it? How much should that cost?

    Thanks in advance!
     
    sue sanchez, May 1, 2004
    #1
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  2. Sue,

    The b230 series engines are all interference engines, and due to my own
    stupidity, mine recently proved how ghastly things can get, I hadn't
    tightened the crankshaft pulley to the correct torque, the timing belt drive
    behind it starting 'rattling', it's locating 'dog' shattered off, the belt
    stopped turning, the engine stopped turning very shortly after, 3 exhaust
    valves were history, one was so badly bent I had to break it to remove it, I
    know I was lucky to get away with relatively minor (to me) damage.

    If you are in any doubt about when the belt was last changed, it's not safe
    to leave it, any experienced mechanic should be able to do the job in an
    hour or less, the timing marks are clear, and easy to interpret, none of the
    fittings/bolts etc are hard to access, the belts themselves are very cheap
    for what they are/do. Here in the UK they average about 14-16 UKP.

    Having never paid anyone to do my spannering (DIY mostly), I couldn't tell
    you how much it would cost to do the job.

    If you can actually see the belt (or remove the cover to get at it), twist
    it round slightly at the longest section, then bend the teeth towards you a
    little (this opens the teeth out a bit), do not crimp or fold the belt, this
    will damage it, any slight evidence of cracking at the base of teeth is an
    indication of being old, and not as reliable as you'd like.

    Best wishes, Ken

    The b230 series engines are all interference engines, and due to my own
    stupidity, mine recently proved how ghastly things can get, I hadn't
    tightened the crankshaft pulley to the correct torque, the timing belt drive
    behind it starting 'rattling', it's locating 'dog' shattered off, the belt
    stopped turning, the engine stopped turning very shortly after, 3 exhaust
    valves were history, one was so badly bent I had to break it to remove it, I
    know I was lucky to get away with relatively minor (to me) damage.

    If you are in any doubt about when the belt was last changed, it's not safe
    to leave it, any experienced mechanic should be able to do the job in an
    hour or less, the timing marks are clear, and easy to interpret, none of the
    fittings/bolts etc are hard to access, the belts themselves are very cheap
    for what they are/do. Here in the UK they average about 14-16 UKP.

    Having never paid anyone to do my spannering (DIY mostly), I couldn't tell
    you how much it would cost to do the job.

    If you can actually see the belt (or remove the cover to get at it), twist
    it round slightly at the longest section, then bend the teeth towards you a
    little (this opens the teeth out a bit), do not crimp or fold the belt, this
    will damage it, any slight evidence of cracking at the base of teeth is an
    indication of being old, and not as reliable as you'd like.

    Best wishes, Ken
     
    Ken Phillips \(UK\), May 1, 2004
    #2
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  3. sue sanchez

    Randy G. Guest


    Just change it. Even if you pay a mechanic to do it, it is a LOT
    cheaper than the damage it can do if it fails. There are plenty of
    older 960s in wrecking yards with destroyed motors from timing belt
    failure. On my 960 the timing belt runs the water pump as well, so I
    keep a spare in the garage so if it feels wonky when I have the belt
    out I change the pump at the same time. There are other related parts
    as well (tensioner, idler, etc) but the mechanic will have to access
    the belt to check these. The idler pully on mine was worn, showing
    signs that it could fail soon. I was glad I changed all teh related
    parts. That doesn't have to be done every time, but they all need to
    be checked. The cost of the tow alone could pay for most of the job.

    from Randy & Valerie
    __ __
    \ \ / /
    \ \/ /
    \__/olvo
    1993 960
     
    Randy G., May 1, 2004
    #3
  4. sue sanchez

    Rod Gray Guest

    All B21, B23, B230, and B230F engines are non-interference engines. Breaking
    the T-belt cannot damage the engine. It pays 2 1/2 hours labour and you
    might as well pay another
    1/2 hr and get the 3 front seals replaced at the same time.
     
    Rod Gray, May 1, 2004
    #4
  5. sue sanchez

    Buc4evr Guest

    All B21, B23, B230, and B230F engines are non-interference engines. Breaking
    I've always heard that only the B20, Diesel, and 16valve 4 bangers were
    interference engines and that the B23, B230 were not ?
    Anyhow I have my B23's timing belt replaced every 50K - 60K miles and it costs
    me about $110 USD at an independent shop.
     
    Buc4evr, May 2, 2004
    #5
  6. sue sanchez

    James Sweet Guest

    Not in north america they're not, the 16v engines are interference but I've
    personally verified that the 8v B230F's are not.
     
    James Sweet, May 3, 2004
    #6
  7. sue sanchez

    James Sweet Guest

    Interference or not, a broken belt will leave you stranded and isn't a
    particularly difficult service, best to just get it done if in doubt.
     
    James Sweet, May 3, 2004
    #7
  8. sue sanchez

    sue sanchez Guest

    Folks, thanks for all your advice.

    My very trustworthy mechanic inspected the belt and it was obvious
    that it had been in use for quite a while. Although the engine is a
    non-interference, I decided to have the belt changed anyway to avoid
    the possibility of being stranded somewhere with a car full of
    homeless dogs.

    Thanks again for your kind help.
     
    sue sanchez, May 10, 2004
    #8
  9. sue sanchez

    sue sanchez Guest

    Folks, thanks for all your advice.

    My very trustworthy mechanic inspected the belt and it was obvious
    that it had been in use for quite a while. Although the engine is a
    non-interference, I decided to have the belt changed anyway to avoid
    the possibility of being stranded somewhere with a car full of
    homeless dogs.

    Thanks again for your kind help.
     
    sue sanchez, May 10, 2004
    #9
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