Converting 71 242E to SU's or Weber

Discussion in 'Volvo 240' started by dondford, Dec 8, 2004.

  1. dondford

    dondford Guest

    Can someone advise if this is possible and/or feasible?

    Thanks,
    Don
     
    dondford, Dec 8, 2004
    #1
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  2. dondford

    James Sweet Guest

    Sure it's possible, but what's on there now?
     
    James Sweet, Dec 8, 2004
    #2
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  3. dondford

    Don Ford Guest

    James:
    Thank you for your post. Its a car I'm looking to buy; I was under
    the impression the "E" meant it was fuel injected. Am I in error?

    Don
     
    Don Ford, Dec 8, 2004
    #3
  4. Re: Converting 71 242E to SU's or Weber

    The 242 wasn't around in 1971 surely?
     
    David Balfour, Dec 8, 2004
    #4
  5. dondford

    brackenburn Guest

    Sounds like a '71 *142E*, and "E"= Fuel injected.

    Andy I.


    | > Re: Converting 71 242E to SU's or Weber
    | > Can someone advise if this is possible and/or feasible?
    | >
    | > Thanks,
    | > Don
    |
    |
    | The 242 wasn't around in 1971 surely?
    |
    |
     
    brackenburn, Dec 8, 2004
    #5
  6. Sorry I missed the start of this thread. It certainly IS possible to
    convert a '71 142 to carburetion. I did it on a '73 142, putting a
    Weber in in place of a PIA fuel injection system.

    To avoid boring the whole group, I would be glad to respond offline.
    Just email me.

    Chuck Fiedler
    Nothing but Volvos since 1973
     
    Chuck Fiedler, Dec 8, 2004
    #6
  7. dondford

    James Sweet Guest

    Ah, yes you're probably right, I thought "E" meant the high compression
    version of the motor but perhaps they were all injected even back as far as
    '71. I'm assuming this is a D-Jet injected 142 then? Is the fuel injection
    completely shot or what? There's a few things that commonly go wrong with D
    Jet but once it's working it provides better performance than a carburetor
    with less fiddling.
     
    James Sweet, Dec 8, 2004
    #7
  8. dondford

    dondford Guest

    No, my typo... its a 71 142E

     
    dondford, Dec 9, 2004
    #8
  9. at least in the US market, the 142E is the D-Jet fuel injected, same as
    found on the 1800E. The US market also had a carburetted model in '71 for
    the 140 series, so a conversion to carb is probably not a major PITA. Later
    140 series fuel injected switched to the K-Jet system, a little more
    straight-forward, but a little less performance than D-Jet.

    There is plenty of science in the carb vs. FI discussion, plenty of personal
    preference, and a tad bit too much religion. For my own personal point of
    view, the SU carbs are easy to understand and overhaul, the D-Jet is mostly
    about tight injector seals, tight fuel hose pressure and seal clamps, and
    clean throttle throat and throttle trigger. When in good condition, both
    systems are pretty reliable and responsive. The B20E engine (for the 1800E
    and the 142E) is high compression, a few more horsepower (assuming good
    compression, which is questionable at this age unless the engine was
    recently overhauled). There is a ton of info on changing from high
    compression head to less compression on other web boards, including
    different manifolds and plugs needed to swap to carb.
     
    Pat Quadlander, Dec 9, 2004
    #9
  10. oh, hell, Chuck, bore me with the details. Don may enjoy it also.
     
    Pat Quadlander, Dec 9, 2004
    #10
  11. dondford

    Jim Carriere Guest

    James, I believe that with engine designations, "E" originally and
    simply meant fuel injection. "F" was introduced later as a reduced
    compression fuel injection (mainly American market) and then "E"
    meant high compression fuel injection (or unchanged compression- the
    same "E" engine as before). "A" was single carburettor and "B" was
    twin carburettor. (One exception was the six cylinder B30A was twin
    carburettor.)

    With the car model suffix, I'm pretty sure "E" meant fuel injection.
    "S" was for the twin carburettor.

    Of course these designations came and went over various model
    years... remember when 240s were sold as only "DL," "GL," and "GLT"
    the year before the 700 was introduced?

    D Jet fuel injection was in a few early model 240s in some markets.
    This system was originally available on Chryslers in the 1950s, but
    wasn't really a big seller. Bosch bought it, made it a little
    better, and then made some money off of it.
     
    Jim Carriere, Dec 9, 2004
    #11
  12. dondford

    Jim Carriere Guest


    James, I believe that with engine designations, "E" originally and
    simply meant fuel injection. "F" was introduced later as a reduced
    compression fuel injection (mainly American market) and then "E"
    meant high compression fuel injection (or unchanged compression- the
    same "E" engine as before). "A" was single carburettor and "B" was
    twin carburettor. (One exception was the six cylinder B30A was twin
    carburettor.)

    With the car model suffix, I'm pretty sure "E" meant fuel injection.
    "S" was for the twin carburettor.

    Of course these designations came and went over various model
    years... remember when 240s were sold as only "DL," "GL," and "GLT"
    the year before the 700 was introduced?

    D Jet fuel injection was originally available on Chryslers in the
    1950s, but wasn't really a big seller. Bosch bought it, made it a
    little better, and then made some money off of it.
     
    Jim Carriere, Dec 9, 2004
    #12
  13. dondford

    Jim Carriere Guest

    I might enjoy it too- I miss my SUs, the most excitement I've got out
    of Motronic and OBD2 is a fault code when I lost my fuel cap :)
     
    Jim Carriere, Dec 9, 2004
    #13
  14. dondford

    Mike F Guest

    Yeah, if people find it boring they just don't have to read it. Putting
    the info out here means it's available to the next guy, assuming he
    knows how to use groups.google.com.

    Also I know IPD used to (still does?) sell kits to do this - 2 manifolds
    and 2 twin choke sidedraft Webers, or one manifold and a downdraft 2
    barrel. However, as a former owner of a '71 142E, I liked the fuel
    injection, and I'd try to fix it first.

    --
    Mike F.
    Thornhill (near Toronto), Ont.

    Replace tt with t (twice!) and remove parentheses to email me directly.
    (But I check the newsgroup more often than this email address.)
     
    Mike F, Dec 9, 2004
    #14
  15. dondford

    John Horner Guest

    Lots of these have been converted to webers over the years, but personally I
    think that is a mistake. The D-jet system does a good job with minimal
    maint. My '72 ES is still running strong on it's D-jet fuel injection.

    On the other hand, I have seen many weber converted cars where the owners
    have never been able to get the jetting tuned in just right.

    YMMV!
    John
     
    John Horner, Dec 10, 2004
    #15
  16. dondford

    Alex Zepeda Guest

    I would stick with fuel injection. D-Jet isn't so great to find parts
    for, however it's a good start for something like MegaSquirt (DIY
    electronic fuel injection). In the long run, you'll probably have a much
    more enjoyable car to drive if you stay with FI.
     
    Alex Zepeda, Dec 10, 2004
    #16
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